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Sir Avanor
2003-09-03 00:13:56
I've been running the Muon software for a few days now, and there's a few things I am wodering about.

1) What does the t=13.27ns (3412/33217 particles) bit actually mean?  I can guess that 13.27 nanoseconds have elapsed in the current trial, but the particle ratio is a mystery to me.  I've been trying to work out a relation between this ratio and the resulting muon transfer percentage, but there seems to be only a very tenuous relationship.  Probably because my understanding of it is poor.

2) I notice that someone has achieved a muon transfer of over 16%. Is this better than a 'conventional' design?

3) When are there going to be new BestNNN files?  I figure that, after 250+ work units without them, I have done by bit for design variety.

4) My best transfer rating is 0.825% is that good or bad for under 300WUs?

Thanks!

He who liketh long words.
[DPC]Stephan202
2003-09-03 08:32:43
Visit http://stephan202.qik.nl for a recent bestNNN file.
0.8% after 300Wu's doesn't seem too bad.  There's a lot of randomness in these calculations.
As for the 16%: those high yields have been created in an artificial way, by random seeding.  That is discussed in another thread on this forum.

---
Dutch Power Cow.
MOOH!
Stephen Brooks
2003-09-04 12:12:55
To answer the question that Stephan202 hasn't dealt with:

quote:
Originally posted by Sir Avanor:
1) What does the t=13.27ns (3412/33217 particles) bit actually mean?  I can guess that 13.27 nanoseconds have elapsed in the current trial, but the particle ratio is a mystery to me.  I've been trying to work out a relation between this ratio and the resulting muon transfer percentage, but there seems to be only a very tenuous relationship.  Probably because my understanding of it is poor.


The numbers of particles are just to do with how the simulation works - in your example there were 33217 particles in total at that point, but most of them had hit walls, and only 3412 were still active.  The 'total' figure goes up because of pion-to-muon decays, which I simulate multiple times for accuracy (so in theory the particles could multiply up to 10 times but in reality they mostly hit walls).

It doesn't make any sense: that's why they call it "virtual"
Sir Avanor
2003-09-05 01:11:54
Thanks for the info guys.

Sir A

He who liketh long words.
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